English Food & Football

If you didn’t read my last entry about “english ed and et“, you can read about what I am doing at Saxon.

This really is going to be so much fun!

According to saxon, here are some more true English terms:

Rubbish bin or bin ( Trash can)
Rubbish ( trash)
Sweets ( candy)
Crisps (chips)
Chips (French fries)

I have to say, I love the word rubbish. I am going to try and add the word to my frequently used vocabulary.

Of course I also love all the food terms. In America, I love to eat sweets, crisps and chips. Because I love these bad fatty foods, I guess I will have to continue worrying about losing a “stone in weight”. (Saxon, losing a stone in weight is also very English) Not that Americans don’t have more weight to lose collectively, but we lose ours in pounds, not stones.

On Saxon’s above entry, Mike Ball made this comment: (I thought I would include these in conjunction with the upcoming US SuperBowl)

Well there’s a few (Americanisms) I’ve come across…
Cleats – in the US are like football boots [ok, I can’t resist leaving an American reaction to football boots…that is funny..football boots…i am picturing NFL players running around in workboots or hiking boots)
Football in the UK is soccer in the US
Football in the US is American Football.

Then Mike adds the question: (do you even use your feet in American Football?) – I have to answer: American football players do sometimes use their feet, but only to run. Kickers (who have a woosy or whimpy reputation in American football are the only players to really use their feet to kick)

Other words that we supposedly mispronounce:
aluminium
tomato
schedule
irrevocably

I found it interesting that these four words, can also be associated with the upcoming Superbowl:
You cook your frozen pizza on an aluminium-lined pan. You have tomato sauce on your pizza, or you can throw tomatoes at the ref. when you don’t agree with his call. All football teams have a schedule and all football fans can be found saying, “I irrevocably decree that my team will win this Sunday.”

I don’t know what else to say about these 4 words except that people in America also differ in opinion on their pronunciation. Maybe you Englishman could give me your pronunciation guide? I would like to pronounce them like an Englishman from now on, just for fun.

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2 comments

  1. Love your blog Alice.My English pronunciation would be…Tom-art-ohAl-um-in-ee-yumSked-yuleI can’t remember who said it but we’re two nations divided by a common language! ;o)

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